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Historic icons diminished: the Long Road to Nepal’s recovery post-earthquake

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The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that hit Nepal Saturday morning has claimed the lives of thousands of people, along with the destruction of numerous landmarks that cannot be replaced. Of the remaining eight million survivors, a majority have been displaced and forced to live in tent cities awaiting aid from outside sources.

With a death toll of 5,000 and rising, damages from the disaster are expected to cost more than $5 billion, according to NPR. Although tourism provides a large portion of Nepal’s revenue, that industry is expected to decline as well. Neighboring countries, like China, India and Pakistan, have offered aid in the form of economic relief and response teams. China has already provided $3 million of immediate relief, and another $200 million in recovery efforts.

The U.S. Agency for International Development has deployed a Disaster Assistance Response Team, and provided an initial $10 million in aid. The UN has provided $15 million in immediate aid as well. To donate to the Red Cross earthquake relief fund, click here.

Many believe that the recovery process will take years for Nepal. With the disaster, homes, lifestyles and cultural icons have been destroyed. The Kathmandu Valley, containing seven groups of cultural monuments, experienced major damages as well. Several of the icons fell to the ground within seconds. Before and after photos of the sites can be seen here. Six of the destroyed landmarks can be seen as follows:

All photos courtesy of creative commons.

Nepal-2011

The Boudhanath stupa

Bhimsen Tower (Dharahara)

Dharahara TowerNepal_Kathmandu_Boudhanath_1

The Swayambhunath stupa

View_of_Bhaktapur_Durbar_Square

Bhaktapur Durbar Square

Patan_durbar_square_01

Patan Durbar Square

DURBAR_SQUARE_KATHMANDU_NEPAL_FEB_2013_(8510693717)

Khatmandu Durbar Square

Along with the cultural sites, hikers on Mt. Everest experienced a massive avalanche. Spring climbing on the world’s tallest mountain was called off on Nepal’s side of the mountain. 11 bodies have been retrieved from the mountain as of Monday, according to the New York Times. With hundreds of thousands of Nepali survivors waiting for foreign aid to come, food, shelter and a lack of safe drinking water are among their top concerns. The death toll is expected to rise as survivors, and bodies, are being discovered.

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4 comments

  1. Though this is a sad topic, this article is written really well! I’ve known about the earthquake that hit Nepal but I didn’t know specific details. This article makes all the information easy to read and in a single place. 

  2. I have a friend that was just in Nepal in few weeks ago, and she said that even just looking at her photos from then, and comparing them to photos of now, it is easy to see all of the devastation. She said that everyone she connected with there is ok, but she can’t communicate with them right now. Sending my best thoughts there.

  3. Well written article. Very sad news and an unfortunate and sad time for Nepal. Hopefully, they can heal and move forward. 

  4. I always find human rights stories interesting. I hope to hear more from you about the disaster in Napal, and how people from around the world, including TCKs, can contribute to the cause.

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